Southern Biscuits (Nathalie Dupree)

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Southern Biscuits
Southern Biscuits.jpg
Product Kindle Books
Author Nathalie Dupree
Publisher Gibbs-Smith
Publication April 1, 2011
Language English
Pages 216 pages
Formats Kindle Edition, Hardcover



Description

Southern Biscuits features recipes and baking secrets for every biscuit imaginable, including hassle-free easy biscuits to embellished biscuits laced with silky goat butter, crunchy pecans, or tangy pimento cheese. The traditional biscuits in this book encompass a number of types, from beaten biscuits of the Old South and England, to Angel Biscuits—a yeast biscuit sturdy enough to split and fill but light enough to melt in your mouth. Filled with beautiful photography, including dozens of how-to photos showing how to mix, stir, fold, roll, and knead, Southern Biscuits is the definitive biscuit baking book.

Editorial Reviews

by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart (Gibbs-Smith, $21.99). We can't think of a better or more definitive source for such a worthy undertaking. (Bonnie S Benwick Washington Post.com ) Southern Biscuits features recipes and baking secrets for every biscuit imaginable, including hassle-free easy biscuits to embellished biscuits laced with silky goat butter, crunchy pecans, or tangy pimento cheese. The traditional biscuits in this book encompass a number of types, from beaten biscuits of the Old South and England, to Angel Biscuits—a yeast biscuit sturdy enough to split and fill but light enough to melt in your mouth. Filled with beautiful photography, including dozens of how-to photos showing how to mix, stir, fold, roll, and knead, Southern Biscuits is the definitive biscuit baking book. From the Inside Flap Layered, fluffy, feathery, silky, soft, and velvety biscuits all come together in Southern Biscuits, a book of recipes and baking secrets for every biscuit imaginable. Southern Biscuits features easy biscuits that are hassle-free and undemanding to make, as well as embellished biscuits laced with silky goat butter, crunchy pecans, or tangy pimento cheese, and everything in between. The biscuits in this book encompass a number of types, from the beaten biscuits of the Old South and England, to biscuits reminiscent of Sunday Supper, to modern trends and ingredient combinations. Try Angel Biscuits-a yeast biscuit sturdy enough to split and fill but light enough to melt in the mouth; Carolina Biscuits-flaky little bites made with cream cheese; or Chocolate Soldiers-mixed with cocoa powder and sprinkled with confectioners' sugar. You will find biscuits for every occasion, from hearty breakfasts to delicate party hors d'oeuvres. Filled with beautiful photography, including dozens of how-to photos showing how to mix, stir, fold, roll, and knead, Southern Biscuits is the definitive biscuit baking book. Nathalie Dupree has written or coauthored many cookbooks, including the James Beard Award-winners Nathalie Dupree's Southern Memories and Nathalie Dupree's Comfortable Entertaining. Her latest book is Shrimp and Grits. She has hosted more than 300 television shows and specials, which have shown nationally on PBS, The Learning Channel, and The Food Network. Dupree holds an Advanced Certificate from the Cordon Bleu and has also written extensively for magazines and newspapers. She lives in Charleston, South Carolina. Cynthia Stevens Graubart is an author and former television producer who began her culinary television production career with "New Southern Cooking with Nathalie Dupree." She is also the author of The One- Armed Cook, called the culinary version of What to Expect When You're Expecting. Graubart lives in Atlanta, Georgia. From the Back Cover The definitive biscuit baking book from James Beard Award-winner Nathalie Dupree and writer and producer Cynthia Stevens Graubart. Nathalie Dupree has written or coauthored many cookbooks, including the James Beard award winner Nathalie Dupree's Southern Memories and Shrimp and Grits.

Cynthia Stevens Graubart is an author and former television producer who began her culinary television production career with New Southern Cooking with Nathalie Dupree in 1985. She is the author of The One-Armed Cook, called the culinary version of What to Expect When You're Expecting. Cynthia and her husband, Cliff, live in Atlanta, Georgia. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. WHAT I S A BISCUIT? A biscuit was originally made out of flour and water, the basis of hardtack carried by early travelers. Ultimately, a little lard was added, the dough was beaten hours before shaping and baking, the final product holding a little slivered country ham, becoming a gourmet's delight called a Beaten Biscuit. (We now make it with a food processor in five minutes.) Once baking powder was developed in the 1800s-replacing the potash that had been used as a leavening-it was added to the same flour and water and, mixed together and shaped into a round, it became a biscuit. (These are still eaten today as Dorm Biscuits.) Any other addition is an extension of the cook's imagination, whether whole milk, buttermilk, sour cream, yogurt, whipping cream, shortening, lard, or butter are used. Each adds a different capacity for leavening or flavoring. The lightest biscuits are made out of delicate white winter-wheat flour, also called "soft wheat" due to its low gluten content. With the addition of a fat and a liquid, usually milk or buttermilk, they are a close cousin to scones, containing sugar and possibly an egg, which the English fill with clotted cream and raspberries and serve for tea, not for breakfast or another meal. The English biscuit, which is a cookie, bears no relation to a scone. The French have a cake-type called "biscuit," which neither cookie, bread, nor scone. There was no agreement over the years about how to spell, define, or pronounce the name of our bread. It just was.